Archive for ‘Oedo Unpluged!’

October 12, 2017

Vampire Weekend (Oedo!! Un❤️pluged! Ch. 6)

by slyborg

By popular demand

I probably should have saved this one for Halloween.

>> Get Oedo!! Unpluged Ch. 6 here <<
[Translator: slyborg  Clean: Rayleigh Typesetter: slyborg Proof: tabv]

The classic portrayal of the vampire, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, dates from 1897. While similar stories first became popular in the early to mid 19th century, it is unlikely these would have been known during the Tenpou era. Japan’s affection for the cryptid seems to date from the 1950s, probably thanks to the dissemination of Hollywood portrayals of the Dracula story.

The Japanese word for the Western vampire,  kyuuketsuki is derived from the reading of the kanji version of the word – 吸血鬼, literally ‘blood-sucking demon’.

September 19, 2017

A Wild Loli Suddenly Appears! (Oedo!! Un❤️pluged! Ch. 5)

by slyborg

That’s not how you make tea, Mystical Loli!!

And our dramatis personae are now complete (for the time being).

>> Get Oedo!! Unpluged Ch. 5 here <<
[Translator: slyborg  Clean: Rayleigh Typesetter: slyborg Proof: tabv]

A sort of mystery in this series and in the recent Onihei anime adaptation is the presence of what appear to be inflated rubber balls. This seems incongruous in Edo-era Japan, since manufacturing gum rubber in such a form would seem to have been beyond the capability of the Japanese economy at the time. Were they imported? Why didn’t they use them to invent basketball? They invented soft tennis almost as soon as tennis and rubber balls appeared in Japan, after all.

 

June 25, 2017

Oiran Kotoba 2 (Oedo!! Un❤️pluged! Ch. 4)

by slyborg

Another release?!

Oh, she was just 17 / If you know, what I mean…

>> Get Oedo!! Unpluged Ch. 4 here <<
[Translator: slyborg  Clean: Rayleigh Typesetter: slyborg Proof: Rayleigh]

TL Note for this one, on page 2 Aki confuses 年金 nenkin ‘pension’ with 年季 nenki ‘indenture contract’. Yeah, not up to Kumeta’s standard for puns. Also, Oharu best shimobe.

 

May 19, 2017

Oiran Kotoba (Oedo!! Un❤️pluged! Ch. 3)

by slyborg

外八文字 – Soto Hachi Monji

Remember that I mentioned that I’m a sucker for kimonos? Probably the only kimonos more elaborate than those worn by the traditional oiran courtesans of old Edo and Kyoto are those worn by the royal family for special occasions, the jūnihitoe or 12-layer kimono. The kimono of the oiran functioned as an advertisement of her wealth and status as well as advertisement in the direct sense by drawing attention to her during the processions called oiran dōchū around the pleasure districts during which the oiran with her attendants and servants would stroll down the streets in full regalia.

In this chapter, we meet Hatsune of Yoshiwara, an oiran and my waifu for this series. Do not steal.

>> Get Oedo!! Unpluged Ch. 3 here <<
[Translator: slyborg  Clean: Rayleigh Typesetter: slyborg]

A specific element of the oiran processions is the special step used by the oiran to enable them to walk in the 15 cm tall shoes called the 三枚歯下駄 sanmaiba geta or “3-toothed clogs” without tripping and without stomping inelegantly like an elephant in the heavy wooden footwear. The soto hachimonji literally means “outside in the shape of the kanji for eight” and refers to how the oiran tilts the geta outward as in the shape of the 八 kanji for the number 8, and then swings her foot forward in a semi-circle, sliding the edge of the geta along the ground as she places one foot in front of the other. As one might imagine, this required a certain amount of skill to perform without error.

Thanks again to Rayleigh for much excellent cleaning and redraw for this chapter! RootP on deck, please continue to wait warmly.

 

March 25, 2017

Last Dango in Edo (Oedo!! Un❤️pluged! Ch. 2)

by slyborg

Tokugawa SpaceX Test Launch

More OU for you.

>> Get Oedo!! Unpluged Ch. 2 here <<
[Translator: slyborg  Clean: Rayleigh Typesetter: slyborg Proof: Rayleigh]

Your cultural/historical note here is the loan amount that appears in this chapter – 10 ryō. During the Tokugawa Shogunate, one ryō was considered roughly the equivalent in value to 1 koku, the amount of rice needed to feed a person for a year. 10 ryō would be an enormous sum for a shop owner, and of course at 90% interest the loan shark has no intention of allowing it to ever be successfully repaid.

Thanks to Rayleigh for much appreciated help cleaning and proofing this chapter, and thanks to Kicchiri’s translator Ditch, who helped me decipher Shogunate-era legalese in cursive!